Latest News

Moderna's mRNA vaccine passes important first hurdle.
Many of you probably already heard that the Moderna vaccine raised a strong immune response in all participants...
Read more
Taking care of a family member, caregiving, does not impact your health
In the U.S. it is estimated that at least 17 million people care for loved ones with significant health...
Read more
A review of vaccine efforts against SARS-CoV-2
The Journal of Virology published a review by Moore and Klasse that summarizes the herculean efforts...
Read more
What does being immune to an infectious disease mean?
There is a ton of talk, justifiably so, about developing immunity to SARS-CoV-2, and whether is it long-lasting?...
Read more
Latest News on COVID-19
Hydroxychloroquine The NIH halted trials of hydroxychloroquine. While the drug did not show significant...
Read more
News

News

Messages list

Show all entries

Gut microbes may put barrier between species

  A recent study, conducted by Professor Seth Bordenstein of Vanderbilt University, proposed that two species of jewel wasp, Nasonia giraulti and Nasonia Vitripennis, remain separate species largely because of microbe interference, not lethal incompatibility in DNA, as many biologists believed.

Read more of Gut microbes may put barrier between species

The microbial communities surrounding radioactive waste dumps

  Growing interest in nuclear power is often hindered by the question of what to do with the radioactive byproducts. One solution is to bury them. In Mol, Belgium, at the HADES research center, scientists have discovered communities of microbes living in the clay surrounding structures that house nuclear waste. Some species of microorganisms are known to have detrimental effects on the materials used for these structures. Researchers have delved hundreds of meters underground in search of wha...

Read more of The microbial communities surrounding radioactive waste dumps

A New Reason Why Red Meat, and Some Energy Drinks, May Be Bad for Our Heart

  We have heard that Red meat is bad for our health, and we know that the high cholesterol content of the meat is what causes atherosclerosis by accumulating in blood vessels. But a new study has found that bacteria in our gut may in fact contribute to heart disease risk. Although this is quite confounding as we have never heard of the involvement of bacteria in heart health, Stanley hazen, the section head and a biochemist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio had published that L-Carnitine in red meat...

Read more of A New Reason Why Red Meat, and Some Energy Drinks, May Be Bad for Our Heart

Nanotechnology product has ability to slice cell membrane

  Normally when one thinks of microbes, they don’t imagine them being able to be mechanically cut as one cuts an onion. Microbes are extremely small and we don’t have blades fine enough to get the job done.  However, researchers at Brown University have shown that the cell membrane of human cells can be cut by graphene microsheets. Graphene is a relatively new nanomaterial that is a two dimensional layer of repeating carbon and is made by exfoliating it off of chucks of graphite u...

Read more of Nanotechnology product has ability to slice cell membrane

Vaccines Various Methods of Creation Defend Against Disease

  Vaccines have been made ever since Edward Jenner created one for smallpox in the late 18th century. The 19th century saw a handful of vaccines created while the 20th witnessed a boom in creation. Today the process of making a vaccine in the United States is highly regulated by the FDA as well as the CDC. However, creating a vaccine is not a straightforward process. There are multiple ways in which a virus or bacteria and be used to create a vaccine that will protect a person for years to come....

Read more of Vaccines Various Methods of Creation Defend Against Disease

A New Model -- And Possible Treatment -- For Staph Bone Infections

  A recent article regarding a study on osteomyelitis, an incapacitating bone infection shows there may be a new treatment available. Bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus (staph), often cause osteomyelitis. The bacteria involved in these infections are often resistant to complete classes of antibiotics, making current treatments insufficient for use and making it very difficult to treatment.

Read more of A New Model -- And Possible Treatment -- For Staph Bone Infections

Structure and Evolution of Streptomyces Interaction Networks in Soil and In Silico

   Streptomyces are gram-positive, filamentous bacteria that are often found in ground soils.  They are prolific produces of antibiotics.  These microbes survive by secreting toxic antibiotics in an effort to kill surrounding, competing microbes. Different strains of Streptomyces produce different secondary metabolites (antibiotics and other secreted chemicals).  The presence of secondary metabolites can either inhibit or promote the growth of a cell.  With this in mi...

Read more of Structure and Evolution of Streptomyces Interaction Networks in Soil and In Silico

Typhoid Toxin May Hold Answers To Mysterious Historical Disease

  Typhoid fever is a predominantly gastric bacterial disease that is found worldwide and is caused by the bacterium Salmonella entrerica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). Typhoid is one of the most well documented diseases in history having ravaged populations as old as the Athenians of ancient Greece and as new as the citizens of Chicago less than a century ago. Modern sanitation and hygiene practices have all but eradicated the disease in developed nations but developing nations are still...

Read more of Typhoid Toxin May Hold Answers To Mysterious Historical Disease

Vitamin C helps control gene activity in stem cells

  Researchers have found that vitamin C is useful for enhancing gene activation. Why is this helpful to us? It can be applied to treating cancer or controlling vitro fertilization. This result was found by comparing mouse embryonic stem cells growing in many different mediums in accident. Then researchers began to find the mechanisms behind the result, and realized that vitamin C actually leads to the increased prevention of activation of an array of genes.    

Read more of Vitamin C helps control gene activity in stem cells

Genomic streamlining in marine microbes

  Knowledge about microbes has proven to be useful for gaining a better understanding of the environment. As an example, phytoplankton – a photosynthetic marine microorganism – was discovered to be a source of half the Earth’s supply of oxygen, thereby providing insight to our relationship with the ocean. However, researchers currently have an understanding about only a tiny fraction out of millions of existing microbial species. The problem is, most marine microbes cannot be...

Read more of Genomic streamlining in marine microbes